Sexually Transmitted Infections

Let’s start with the basics – have a go at the quiz below… and no cheating!

STI QUIZ: 

  1. What is the difference between an STI & an STD?
  2. What is the most common STI in the UK?
  3. How do you know if you have an STI?
  4. What are the four ways a service uses to screen for STIs?
  5. Name 3 STIs you can catch without any sexual contact?
  6. Who were the first recorded people to use condoms?
  7. Latex condoms first came on to the market in what decade?
  8. Why do they make flavoured condoms?
  9. What were European condoms originally made from in the 1500s?
  10. 10.What is a MERKIN and what does it have to do with STI

To print off or download a pdf version to use in class STI Quiz

Transmission:

No matter what your sexual preference there is still the possibility of catching or passing on a sexually transmitted infection – and remember just because you are using another form of contraception, unless it is a condom or a femidom –you won’t be protected.

It is possible to transmit infections through all types of sexual contact, although it is far more likely if you are having penetrative sex.

For transmission to occur, there needs to be a route of transmission for the infected fluid to make it inside another person’s body; for this reason many people are under the impression that two girls having sex together would be immune. Whilst it is less likely, there are still clear routes of transmission through oral sex, sharing fingers during manual sex, sharing sex toys or through tribbing.

Now teaching STIs is a topic that has been done so badly over time. May young people today are still regaled with the umbrella test story (which never has existed and is an urban myth); or are still shown horrific full colour pictures from medical books of infected genitals.

It is widely accepted that shock tactics don’t work. The stack of evidence says all it achieves is an average of at least one student in every class fainting. It doesn’t put young people off sex or encourage them to use a condom… it simply makes people feel ill – there is absolutely no educational or health benefits from waving the pictures around so please don’t do it!

The best way I have found of teaching young people about STIs is by using the milk game… not only is it very visual, but it also opens up lots of discussions about behaviours and relationships – which is far more beneficial… plus it is usually really good fun.

For a full explanation watch this….

 

More info…

How do you know if you have caught an STI?

Common symptoms include: unusual discharge (remembers a girl’s discharge may change naturally throughout her cycle – so it means unusual for you), a change in colour, amount, consistency or smell – normal discharge doesn’t smell bad; lower abdominal pain, or pain whilst urinating, pain during sex; itching, visible sores or warts etc.

However, many of the most common STIs such as: Chlamydia, gonorrhoea, and even HIV, rarely carry any noticeable symptoms to begin with. So, if you have ever had unprotected sex it is best to get yourself checked out – regardless of whether you actually have any symptoms or not. It is better to be safe than sorry as they say.

In terms of Chlamydia there are often free self tests you can get hold of without the need of accessing an official sexual health service you can even order a free postal test kit through freetest.me. They are very easy to do – simply fill in a short confidential online form and they will send you a kit through the post. Pee in the plastic pot provided, and drop it back in the post. You will usually get the results back within 2 weeks – you can even track your test via the website.

You can even choose how you wish to be contacted – most people choose to give their mobile phone number – so they receive a short txt to say “the recent sample you provided is clear”. If worse come to worse and you provide a positive sample – it is not the end of the world – you will simply be asked to pop along to your local clinic where they will give you a short course of antibiotics – in most cases, only a single tablet you take there and then and you’re all better!

However, if you want a thorough check up to screen for all types of STIs then you will more than likely have to visit your local GUM clinic (Genito-urinary Medicine clinic) find your nearest service here:

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